Is Jade Plant Poisonous To Humans?

Most of your probably know of the beautiful jade plant. You can find it in many homes in every city. 

The jade plant is a popular succulent. It has a fleshy and oval leaf. Its stems are woody and resemble tiny tree trunks. With very little care, jade plants can grow from 3 to 6 feet tall. But it does grow slowly at about 2 inches per year only.

Hence, you can have jade plants placed in small containers and are used as decorations in the home. But while this plant is beautiful, you also need to be careful of its effects when intoxicated by humans and pets.

 Just like any other succulent, jade plants can be toxic to both humans and animals. Today on the blog, we will discuss how poisonous this plant is and the proper way to grow them safely. 

Is Jade Plant Poisonous To Humans?

The short answer is “yes.” The Jade plant is poisonous to humans according to ASPCA. It can cause toxic reactions when ingested such as vomiting and diarrhea. 

 The sap of the jade plant can also cause mild irritation or burning sensation when it comes in contact with your skin. 

If you have kids in the home, you should be careful about putting jade plants as countertop decorations. Your kids can possibly pick their leaves as part of their pretend play. 

However, if you believe that your kids have accidentally ingested jade plants, you should contact your physician right away. An antidote and other medical solutions can be applied to your kids to alleviate the symptoms. 

Is Jade Plant Poisonous To Dog?

The jade plant is extremely poisonous to dogs and cats. The toxins present in the sap of the jade plant can react to the digestive system of your pets in just a matter of seconds. 

The jade plant is extremely poisonous to dogs and cats

Learn more about: Are Succulents Bad For Cats: Here’s the Truth

It can cause gastric distress with excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Your pet may also show signs of depression, weakness, and lethargy. 

If you have a jade plant in the home, you should place it on counters that are unreachable by your pets and kids.

What To Do If My Pet Is Poisoned By Jade Plants

Jade plants have been reported by ASPC as having poisonous effects on animals or intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract. While jade plants have many varieties, you should first get to know which varieties you have. If you are a first-timer, we understand that you cannot distinguish jade plants right away from other succulents with the same shape and color.

Also, be advised that the consumption of jade plants may cause vomiting and gastrointestinal upset for dogs and cats. Plants are listed as either non-toxic or potentially toxic with mild GI upset as their symptoms are not expected to be life-threatening to your pets.

If you believe that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance, you should take your dog to the vet right away 

Symptoms Of Jade Poisoning

Common

  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Hiding
  • Depression
  • Aggression

Rare

  • Convulsions
  • Slow heart rate
  • Impaired muscle movement 

The following are the procedures that your local vet will most likely do for your dog upon finding that your pet suffers from jade plant poisoning.

1. Evacuation

2. Decontamination

3. Fluid therapy

4. Medication

5. Observation

Jade Plant Poisonous To Humans: Knowing The Jade Varieties

Types Of Jade Plants

There are about a dozen types of jade plants, and all of these plant types go by the same scientific name. Below are the two most common jade plants.

Crassula Ovata

Also known as “money” tree, the jade plant is a popular plant. Many call it lucky tree also, probably because it makes the house pleasant.

But we are not certain why it is called money tree, or whether the money factor is true, we’re sure that the Jade plant is high-demand. As a matter of fact, it is very popular.

This tear-shaped succulent plant can grow 1.1 -3.5 inches. It can grow many leaves given the proper care it needs.

Other common types:

  • Baby jade
  • Dwarf rubber tree
  • Chinese rubber plant
  • Dollar plant
  • Jade tree
  • Tree of happiness
  • Japanese rubber plant
  • Lucky plant
  • Penny plant

 Jade Plant Poisonous To Humans: Handling and Care

Even though jade plants are toxic to both humans and animals, we understand that you still want to grow a healthy jade plant. As they say, this plant might invite more luck to your home. 

If you place it in the proper location, you won’t have any issue with intoxication. 

Propagating Jade Plant 

The jade plant is notable for its simplicity of engendering, and new plants can be effectively spread from a solitary leaf or cutting was taken from a mother plant, offering you the chance to definitely build your assortment effortlessly. The best ideal opportunity to engender jade plants is throughout the late spring when they’re probably going to get abundant daylight and moistness. Here’s the secret:

To Propagate With Cuttings: 

  • Start by taking a cutting that is something like a few creeps long. It ought to be taken from a solid, mature plant that is liberated from sickness.
  • Permit the slicing to sit for quite a long time in a warm, dry spot. You are prepared to continue once the finish of the removing has dried and scabbed over.
  • Plunge the cutting in an establishing chemical powder.
  • Plant the cut finish of the stem in a pot containing a combination of half soil, half vermiculite (or perlite).
  • Water sparingly, just until the preparing blend is soggy. Your cutting should flourish in half a month, so, all in all, you can start to really focus on the cutting as you would an ordinary jade plant.

To Propagate With Leaves: 

  • Start by taking a leaf-cutting that incorporates the stem of the leaf (turning it from the plant delicately can help). Cuttings without this unblemished won’t root. It ought to be taken from a sound, mature plant that is liberated from illness.
  • Permit the slicing to sit for quite some time in a warm, dry spot. You are prepared to continue once the finish of the removing has dried and scabbed over.
  • Plunge the injury of the cutting in an establishing chemical powder.
  • Spot the cutting on top of. a gardening soil mix that contains half soil, half vermiculite (or perlite). The leaf slicing shouldn’t be covered—basically connecting with the dirt will be adequately adequate to provoke development.
  • Spot the plant in a warm splendid spot, moistening sometimes to keep the plant scarcely wet. Roots and child plants should start showing up around the edge of the leaf, so, all things considered, you can start to really focus on the cutting like a customary jade plant.

Read more about: Are Succulents Toxic To Dogs: Here’s The Truth

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